Managing Road Rage

Professional drivers have many frustrations associated with their profession.  One of which is the consistent barrage of other cars and trucks driving aggressively on the roadways.  A true professional driver does everything possible to leave an assured distance and keep their “no zone” clear of vehicles.  However, even the most diligent drivers find themselves fighting a never ending battle at times.  Try as they may, if feels like nothing they do can keep the onslaught of aggressive drivers from encroaching on the safety buffer they leave around them.  

At this point, drivers have a choice, some take the “high road” and keep calm, while others take the “low road” and transform into the very driver they were originally trying to avoid. 

Given the current circumstances, getting aggravated with other drivers is an easy place to find yourself.  Unfortunately, accidents are a common result of acting out your aggravation in the form of road rage.

 Hey, we’re all human! Truthfully, there is a lot of harm that can happen from allowing your emotions get the best of you on the highway and here is why:

Getting angry can take a toll on you mentally. Frequently getting worked up can actually wear you out and make you extremely tired. Drivers experience long days, and staying mentally sharp as long as possible is the best way to ensure top safety conditions.

Stress can be unhealthy both mentally and physically to your long term health. Stress can affect your heart and body. The best way to keep your long-term health in tact is to limit as much daily stress as possible.

High blood pressure can also be associated with stress. Allowing anger and stress to overcome your emotions will not allow you to enjoy your time in the truck. As a driver, you spend a long time behind the wheel, and you don’t want to spend it angry and stressed. Keep alert, learn to cope with frustrations, be prepared to finds ways to deal with your stress, and you will stay healthy both mentally and physically.

You’re going to experience bad weather, aggressive drivers, breakdowns, and miserable people. There’s no avoiding it. But you can remain unaffected by it. Drivers who have done the best with controlling road rage remain unaffected by any negativity happening around them. Before getting in the truck, expect that the day might not go as planned. Expect that there will be that aggressive driver trying to make your day difficult. Expect a possible traffic delay or some nasty weather coming. Having these expectations to start off with has helped drivers become less stressed when a difficult situation does come up. This learned skill will get better as time goes on, and you will be able to cope with stressful situations quicker and better than before as you experience all kinds of circumstances. Learning to manage certain amounts of road rage and stress will lead to both short-term and long-term success as a truck driver.